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HomeCountriesEast Africa › Somalia

Somalia Country AET Profile

About Somalia

In the mid-1980s, literacy remained low, perhaps 18% among adult men and 6% among adult women. In 1990 UNESCO estimated the adult literacy rate to be 24.1% (males, 36.1%; females, 14.0%). An estimated 2% of government expenditure was allocated to education in the period between 1986 and 1993.

During 1992, Somalia was in a state of anarchy and not only did the country's economy collapse, but its educational system as well. Few schools were operating and even the Somali National University was closed in 1991. As of 1996, some schools were beginning to reopen.

Only 1.6% of Somalia's total land area is cultivated, and 69% is permanent pasture. There are two main types of agriculture, one indigenous and the other introduced by European settlers. The Somalis have traditionally engaged in rain-fed dry-land farming or in dry-land farming complemented by irrigation from the waters of the Shabeelle and Jubba rivers or from collected rainwater. Corn, sorghum, beans, rice, vegetables, cotton, and sesame are grown by both methods. Somali and Italian farmers operating the banana farms practice more modern European-style techniques, as do some of the newly created Somali cooperatives. A system of state-administered farms grew rapidly during the early 1970s.

Institutions in Somalia

Reports on Somalia
Somalia - Current Student Enrolment and Academic Staffing



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